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Ohio Marijuana Law, Regulation, Penalties, Attornies & Congressman

Ohio Marijuana Law, Regulation, Penalties, Attornies & Congressman

Offense Penalty Incarceration   Max. Fine  

Possession

Less than 100 g Misdemeanor N/A $ 150
100 – 200 g Misdemeanor 30 days $ 250
200 – 1,000 g Felony 1 year $ 2,500
1,000 – 20,000 g Felony 1 – 5 years $ 10,000
20,000 – 40,000 g Felony 5* – 8 years $ 15,000
More than 40,000 g Felony 8 years* $ 20,000
* Mandatory minimum sentence

Sale/Distribution/Trafficking

A gift of 20 g or less (first offense) Misdemeanor N/A $ 150
A gift of 20 g or less (second offense) Misdemeanor 60 days $ 500
Less than 200 g Felony 1 year $ 2,500
200 – 1,000 g Felony 18 months $ 2,500
1,000 – 20,000 g Felony 1 – 5 years $ 10,000
20,000 – 40,000 g Felony 5* – 8 years $ 15,000
More than 40,000 g Felony 8 years* $ 20,000
To a minor, within 1000 feet of a school, within 100 feet of a juvenile, or by one who has a previous drug conviction will increase the term of imprisonment and the fine.
* Mandatory minimum sentence

Cultivation

See Possession

Hash & Concentrates

Possession of less than 5g/1g (solid/liquid) Misdemeanor N/A $ 150
Possession of 5g/1g – 10g/2g (solid/liquid) Misdemeanor 30 days $ 250
Possession of 10g/2g – 50g/10g (solid/liquid) Felony 1 year $ 2,500
Possession of 50g/10g – 1,000g/200g (solid/liquid) Felony 3 years $ 10,000
Possession of 1,000g/200g (solid/liquid) or more Felony 8 years $ 15,000
Selling less than 10g/2g (solid/liquid) Felony 1 year $ 2,500
Selling 10g/2g – 50g/10g (solid/liquid) Felony 18 months $ 5,000
Selling 50g/10g – 1,000g/200g (solid/liquid) Felony 3 years $ 10,000
Selling 1,000g/200g (solid/liquid) or more Felony 8 years $ 15,000
Manufacture Felony 8 years $ 15,000

Paraphernalia

Possession of paraphernalia Misdemeanor N/A $ 150
Sale of paraphernalia Misdemeanor 90 days $ 750

Miscellaneous

Any drug conviction (including a paraphernalia conviction) may result in a driver’s license suspension for a period of 6 months – 5 years.

Penalty Details

Possession

Possession of less than 100 grams is a minor misdemeanor punishable by a $150 fine.*

Possession of 100 – 200 grams is a misdemeanor punishable by a maximum sentence of 30 days imprisonment and a maximum fine of $250.

Possession of 200 – 1,000 grams is a felony, punishable by up to one year in jail and a maximum fine of $2,500.**

Possession of 1,000 – 20,000 grams is a third degree felony punishable by 1-5 years imprisonment and/or a fine of $5,000 – $10,000.

Possession of 20,000 – 40,000 grams is a second-degree felony punishable by between 5-8 years of imprisonment, and/or a maximum fine of $15,000.

Possession of more than 40,000 grams is a second-degree felony punishable by at least 8 years imprisonment and/or a maximum fine of $20,000.

See

  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 2925.11 (2015)

* A minor misdemeanor does not create a criminal record in Ohio.

Cultivation

Penalties for the cultivation of marijuana are identical to the penalties for possessing an equivalent amount, in weight, of marijuana. See the chart above for further guidance.

See

  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §2925.04 (2015)

** Ohio provides an affirmative defense for this level of cultivation if the defendant can meet the burden to prove that the marijuana was intended solely for personal use by a preponderance of the evidence. If this defense is successful, the defendant can still be convicted of, or plead guilty to, a misdemeanor violation of illegal cultivation of marihuana.

Sale/Distribution/Trafficking

A gift of 20 grams or less is a minor misdemeanor punishable by a maximum fine of $150.

A second conviction for a gift of 20 grams or less is a misdemeanor punishable by a maximum sentence of 60 days imprisonment and a maximum fine of $500.

The sale of up to 200 grams is a felony, punishable by a maximum sentence of 12 months imprisonment and/or a maximum fine of $2,500.

The sale of 200 grams – 1,000 grams is a fourth degree felony, punishable by up to 18 months imprisonment and/or a maximum fine of $2,500.

The sale of 1,000 – 20,000 grams is a third degree felony punishable by a sentence of 1-5 years imprisonment and/or a maximum fine of $10,000.

The sale of 20,000 – 40,000 grams is a second-degree felony punishable by between 5-8 years imprisonment and/or a maximum fine of $15,000.

The sale of over 40,000 grams is a second-degree felony, punishable by a mandatory 8 years imprisonment and/or a maximum fine of $20,000.

The sale of marijuana to a minor, within 1,000 feet of a school, within 100 feet of a juvenile, or by one who has a previous drug conviction is a felony which will increase the length of the term of imprisonment and the fine.

See

  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 2925.03 (2015) 
  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 2929.13 (2015) 
  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 2929.18 (2015) 
  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 2929.22 (2015) 

Hash & Concentrates

Possession of up to 5 grams of solid hashish (1 gram of liquid hashish) is a minor misdemeanor punishable by a fine no greater than $150.

Possession of 5-10 grams of solid hashish (1-2 grams of liquid hashish) is a misdemeanor punishable by a fine no greater than $250 and/or a term of imprisonment no greater than 30 days.

Possession of 10-50 grams of solid hashish (2-10 grams of liquid hashish) is a felony punishable by a maximum fine of $2,500 and/or a maximum term of 1-year imprisonment.

Possession 50 -1,000 grams of solid hashish (10 – 200 grams of liquid hashish) is a felony punishable by a fine no greater than $10,000 and/or a term of imprisonment no less than 9 months and no greater than 3 years.

Possession of 1,000- 2,000 grams of solid hashish (200 – 400 grams of liquid hashish) is a felony in the second degree, punishable by up to 8 years imprisonment and/ or up to a $15,000 fine.

Possession of over 2,000 grams of solid hashish (400 grams of liquid hashish) is a felony in the second degree punishable by a fine no greater than $15,000 and/or a term of imprisonment of 8 years.

See

  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §2925.11(C)(7) (2015) 
  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann.  §2929.28  (2015) 
  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §2929.24 (2015)
  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann.  §2929.18 (2015)
  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §2929.14 (2015)

Selling less than 10 grams of solid hashish (less than 2 grams of liquid hashish) is a felony punishable by a maximum fine of $2,500 and/or a term of imprisonment no less than 6 months and no greater than 1 year.

Selling 10 – 50 grams of solid hashish (2 -10 grams) of liquid hashish is a felony punishable by a fine no greater than $5,000 and/ or a term of imprisonment no less than 6 months and no greater than 18 months.

Selling between 50 – 250 grams of solid hashish (10-50 grams of liquid hashish) is a felony, punishable by a fine no greater than $10,000 and/or a term of imprisonment no less than 9 months and no greater than 3 years.

Selling between 250- 1,000 grams of solid hashish (50 -200 grams of liquid hashish) is a felony punishable by a fine no greater than $10,000 and/or a term of imprisonment no less than 9 months and no greater than 3 years.

Selling between 1,000 – 2,000 grams of solid hashish (200 – 400 grams of liquid hashish) is a felony punishable by a fine no greater than $15,000 and a term of imprisonment no less than 5 years and no greater than 8 years.

Selling over 2,000 grams of solid hashish (over 400 grams of liquid hashish) is a felony by a maximum fine of $15,000 and /or a term of imprisonment of 8 years.

See

  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann., §2925.03(C)(7) (2015)
  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann.  §2929.18 (2015) 
  • Ohio Rev,Code  Ann. §§2929.14 (2015) 

Manufacturing hashish is a felony of the second degree punishable by a maximum fine of $15,000 and/or a maximum of 8 years imprisonment.

See

  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann.  §2925.04(C)(2) (2015)
  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 2929.18 (2015)
  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §2929.14 (2015) 

Paraphernalia

Possession of marijuana paraphernalia is a minor misdemeanor, punishable by a maximum fine of $150, possible community service, and  suspension of the offender’s driver’s license for 6 months – five years.

See

  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 2925.141 (2015) 

The sale of paraphernalia is a misdemeanor punishable by a maximum sentence of 90 days imprisonment and a maximum fine of $750.

See

  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 2925.14 (2015)
  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 2929.13 (2015) 
  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 2929.22 (2015) 

Any device or equipment used to create or manufacture hashish is considered drug paraphernalia. Possession of such equipment is a misdemeanor of the fourth degree punishable by a maximum fine of $250 and/or maximum 30-day jail sentence. Selling or manufacturing any such device or equipment is a misdemeanor of the second degree punishable by maximum fine of $750 and/or a maximum 90-day term of imprisonment. If any such device or equipment was sold to a minor, the offense is a misdemeanor in the first degree punishable by a fine no greater than $1,000 and/or a term of imprisonment no greater than 180 days. Advertising the sale of such equipment is a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine no greater than $750 and a term of imprisonment no greater than 90 days.

See

  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §2925.14(2) (2015)
  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §2929.18 (2015)
  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §2929.14 (2015)

Miscellaneous

Any conviction for possession of a controlled substance is subject to driver’s license revocation for no less than 6 months and no more than 5 years.

See

  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 2925.11(E)(2) (2015)
  • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 2925. 14 (2015) 
CONDITIONAL RELEASE

The state allows conditional release or alternative or diversion sentencing for people facing their first prosecutions. Usually, conditional release lets a person opt for probation rather than trial. After successfully completing probation, the individual’s criminal record does not reflect the charge.

DECRIMINALIZATION

The state has decriminalized marijuana to some degree. Typically, decriminalization means no prison time or criminal record for first-time possession of a small amount for personal consumption. The conduct is treated like a minor traffic violation.

DRUGGED DRIVING

This state has a per se drugged driving law enacted. In their strictest form, these laws forbid drivers from operating a motor vehicle if they have a detectable level of an illicit drug or drug metabolite (i.e., compounds produced from chemical changes of a drug in the body, but not necessarily psychoactive themselves) present in their bodily fluids above a specific, state-imposed threshold. Further information about cannabinoids and their impact on psychomotor performance is available here. Additional information regarding cannabinoids and proposed per se limits is available here.

MANDATORY MINIMUM SENTENCE

When someone is convicted of an offense punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence, the judge must sentence the defendant to the mandatory minimum sentence or to a higher sentence. The judge has no power to sentence the defendant to less time than the mandatory minimum. A prisoner serving an MMS for a federal offense and for most state offenses will not be eligible for parole. Even peaceful marijuana smokers sentenced to “life MMS” must serve a life sentence with no chance of parole.

MEDICAL MARIJUANA

This state has medical marijuana laws enacted. Modern research suggests that cannabis is a valuable aid in the treatment of a wide range of clinical applications. These include pain relief, nausea, spasticity, glaucoma, and movement disorders. Marijuana is also a powerful appetite stimulant and emerging research suggests that marijuana’s medicinal properties may protect the body against some types of malignant tumors, and are neuroprotective.

Ohio Drugged Driving

In Ohio, a person is guilty of DUI if he or she operates any vehicle under the influence of alcohol, a drug of abuse, or a combination of them. Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 4511.19 (West 2010).

In Ohio the threshold for drugged driving is illustrated in the following table. Ohio’s DUI Per Se Levels Id.§ 4511.19(A)(1)(vii); Id. § 4511.19(A)(1)(viii)(I)-(II).

Prohibited Substance Urine Blood
Marijuana 10 ng/ml 2 ng/ml
Marijuana metabolite 35 ng/ml 50 ng/ml
Marijuana metabolite in combination with alcohol or other drugs 15 ng/ml 5 ng/ml

Affirmative Defense

It is a valid defense if a person obtained the controlled substance pursuant to a prescription issued by a licensed health professional authorized to prescribe drugs, and the person injected, ingested, or inhaled the controlled substance in accordance with the health professional’s directions. Id. § 4511.19(K)(1)-(2).

NOTE: A doctor’s recommendation to use cannabis is NOT a prescription.

Implied Consent

  • Any person who operates a vehicle upon a highway or any public or private property used by the public for vehicular travel or parking within this state or who is in physical control of a vehicle shall be deemed to have given consent to a chemical test or tests of the person’s whole blood, blood serum or plasma, breath, or urine to determine the alcohol, drug of abuse, controlled substance, metabolite of a controlled substance, or combination content of the person’s whole blood, blood serum or plasma, breath, or urine. Id. § 4511.191(A)(2).
  • If a person refuses to submit to chemical testing the penalty is license suspension for 1 year for the first refusal, two years for the second refusal, and three for the third refusal. Id. § 4511.191(B)(1).
  • An arrestee who refuses to submit to blood alcohol test until he or she speaks with an attorney, arrestee has essentially refused a chemical test. Dobbins v. Ohio Bur. of Motor Vehicles 75, 664 N.E.2d 908 (1996).
  • Arrestee’s request to confer with attorney before submitting to test was not refusal, where attorney had been contacted on first attempt and came to police station within 15 minutes. Stone v McCullion, 500 NE2d 326 (1985).
  • The law enforcement agency by which the officer is employed shall designate which of the tests shall be administered. Id. § 4511.191(A)(3).

Penalties

  • First offense 1st degree misdemeanor – mandatory minimum of 3 days consecutive imprisonment; maximum of 6 months imprisonment; OR required attendance in a driver’s intervention program for 3 days; fine not less than $375, not more than $1075; 6 months to 3 year suspension. Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §§ 4511.19 (G)(1)(a)(i),(iii),(iv) (West 2010); Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §4510.02(A)(5) (West 2010).
  • Second offense (within 6 years) 1st degree misdemeanor – mandatory minimum of 10 consecutive days imprisonment, maximum imprisonment 6 months; required assessment by alcohol and drug treatment program; fine not less than $525, not more than $1,625; class 4 license suspension (1 to 5 years); offender’s vehicle and license plates impounded for 90 days. Id. §§ 4511.19 (G)(1)(b)(i),(iii)-(v); Id. § 4510.02(A)(4); Id. § 4511.193(B)(2)(a).
  • Third offense (within 6 years) misdemeanor – mandatory minimum of 30 consecutive days imprisonment; maximum of not more than 1 year Fine not less than $850, not more than $2,750; class 3 license suspension; (2 to 10 years); required participation in an alcohol and drug addiction program; criminal forfeiture of vehicle. Id. §§ 4511.19 (G)(1)(c)(i), (iii),(iv),(vi); Id. § 4511.193(B)(2)(b).
  • Fourth or Fifth offense 4th degree felony – mandatory minimum of 60 days consecutive imprisonment; maximum imprisonment for 1 to 5 years; fine not less than $1350, not more than $10,500; 3 years to life license suspension; required participation in an alcohol and drug addiction program; potential criminal forfeiture of vehicle. Id. §§ 4511.19 (G)(1)(d)(i),(iii), (vi); Id. § 4510.02(A)(2); Id. § 4511.19(G)(1)(d)(v).
  • Sixth Offense (or more) 3rd degree felony – mandatory minimum of 120 days consecutive imprisonment; imprisonment for 1 to 5 years; fine of not less than $1350, not more than $10,500; license suspension; mandatory participation in an alcohol and drug addiction program; potential criminal forfeiture of vehicle. Id. §§ 4511.19 (G)(1)(d)(i),(iii)-(v).

Sobriety Checkpoints

In Ohio, law enforcement officials can conduct sobriety checkpoints under state and federal Constitution.

  • Public interest was unquestionably advanced in an effective manner by sobriety checkpoint. Furthermore, police were not granted unfettered discretion, the checkpoint was publicly announced and cars were stopped in a non-discriminatory fashion. State v. Bauer, 651 N.E. 2d 46 (1994).

Case Law

State v. McLemore, 612 N.E.2d 795 (1992) — Positive urinalysis test for cannabis, along with signs of impaired driving, failed field sobriety tests, and cannabis in the defendant’s car, was sufficient to support a conviction for driving under the influence of marijuana. No threshold level of concentration of controlled substances is required.

Columbus v. Freeman, 908 N.E.2d 1026 (2009) — In Ohio, an intoxicated individual may use a vehicle as shelter, but may not operate a vehicle. ‘Operate’ is defined as “to cause or have caused movement of a vehicle.” Ohio does not have a safe harbor provision allowing drivers to pull over and sleep it off. You may still be charged with operating a vehicle while intoxicated if it can be proven you drove while intoxicated.

Per Se Drugged Driving Laws

Ohio has a per se drugged driving law enacted for cannabis, cannabis metabolites, and other controlled substances.

Under Ohio’s law, motorists with detectable levels of THC in the blood above 2 ng/ml or detectable levels of THC-COOH in the urine above 15 ng/ml are guilty of DUID. (Ohio Revised Code Annotated Section 4511.19, Amended by Senate Bill 8)

Penalty:

  • If violated, a mandatory jail term of three consecutive days (seventy-two consecutive hours.) The court may sentence an offender to both an intervention program and a jail term. The court may impose a jail term in addition to the three-day mandatory jail term or intervention program. However, in no case shall the cumulative jail term imposed for the offense exceed six months.
  • The court may suspend the execution of the three-day jail term under this division if the court, in lieu of that suspended term, places the offender under a community control sanction and requires the offender to attend, for three consecutive days, a drivers’ intervention program.
  • License may be suspended from a definite period of six months to five years.

Ohio’s law took effect in August 2006.

Ohio Medical Marijuana Law

Status

 

Not Yet Operational

Law Signed:

 2016

QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

  • Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease)
  • Cancer
  • Chronic traumatic encephalopathy
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Epilepsy or other seizure disorders
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Pain that is either of the following nature: (i) Chronic and severe; or (ii) Intractable
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Positive status for HIV
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Sickle cell anemia
  • Spinal cord disease or injury
  • Tourette’s syndrome
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Ulcerative colitis

PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

Not yet specified. Cannabis-specific products may be dispensed as oils, tinctures, edibles, patches, or as herbal material

HOME CULTIVATION

No, but provisions in the law provide limited legal protections for qualifying patients who acquire cannabis from out-of-state sources prior to the operation of state-licensed dispensaries.

STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES

Yes

STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES OPERATIONAL

Not yet

CAREGIVERS

No

RECIPROCITY

Not specified

CONTACT INFORMATION

Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program • Enrolled Text of the Law

Ohio Verified Marijuana / Cannabis Attorney / Lawyers

Joe Suhre

513-333-0014

Joe Suhre

Suhre & Associates, LLC
600 Vine Street, Suite 1004

CincinnatiOH 45202

www.suhrelaw.com

Phone: 513-333-0014

Bradley Groene

513-338-1890

Bradley Groene

Luftman, Heck & Associates LLP
810 Sycamore St Fl 3

CincinnatiOH 45202

www.cincinnaticriminalattorney.com

Phone: 513-338-1890

Jeffry F. Kelleher

216-241-0520

Jeffry Francis Kelleher

Jeffry F Kelleher & Associates
323 W. Lakeside Avenue Suite 300

ClevelandOH 44113

Phone: 216-241-0520

Daniel Michael Margolis

216-348-1000

Daniel Michael Margolis

Margolis & Atzberger, LLC
1360 West 9th Street Suite 200

ClevelandOH 44113

www.danmargolis.com

Phone: 216-348-1000

Tony A. Clymer

614-515-1645

Tony Clymer

The Law Office of Tony A. Clymer
1420 Matthias Drive

ColumbusOH 43224

www.tonyclymer.com

Phone: 614-515-1645

Brian David Joslyn

614-444-1900

Brian David Joslyn

Joslyn Law Firm
501 S High St

ColumbusOH 43215

www.criminalattorneycolumbus.com

Phone: 614-444-1900

Charles A Koenig

614-454-5010

Charles A Koenig

Koenig & Long
5354 N. High Street

ColumbusOH 43214

www.columbuscriminaldefenseattorney.com

Phone: 614-454-5010

Fred Joseph Rafidi

330-788-5555

Fred Joseph Rafidi

The Law Office of Fred J. Rafidi, LLC
814 N. State Street

GirardOH 44420

www.fredrafidi.com

Phone: 330-788-5555

Timothy Douglas Clifford

419-677-6347

Timothy Douglas Clifford

T. Douglas Clifford, Attorney at Law
26 Benedict Ave.

NorwalkOH 44857

www.norwalkohiolaw.com

Phone: 419-677-6347

Kenneth R. Bailey

419-625-1234

Kenneth R. Bailey

K. Ronald Bailey & Assoc. Co. L.P.A.
220 West Market Street

SanduskyOH 44870

www.baileyandassoc.com

Phone: 419-625-1234

Richard Lee Roberts Sr.

419-244-4777

Richard Lee Roberts

 
1700 Canton Avenue, Suite 2

ToledoOH 43624

Phone: 419-244-4777

Brien Miller

513-860-5533

Brien Miller

The Meadows Law Firm
5900 West Chester Road Suite E

West ChesterOH 45069

www.meadowslawfirm.com

Phone: 513-860-5533

Jeffrey Charles Meadows

513-334-0777

Jeffrey Meadows

The Meadows Law Firm
5900 West Chester Road Suite E

West ChesterOH 45069

www.meadowslawfirm.com

Phone: 513-334-0777

Thomas Haren

216-566-8200

Thomas Gregory Haren

Seeley, Savidge, Ebert & Gourash Co., LPA
26600 Detroit Rd. Suite 300

WestlakeOH44145

www.tomharen.com

Phone: 216-566-8200
 
 

Ohio Congressman

Senators

Sherrod Brown (D)

OHIO

 

Grade: D

Votes

 

Comments

“While it is important to consider the potential medical benefits of marijuana, particularly for terminally ill patients whose quality of life may hinge on effective pain management, there are risks associated with making marijuana legally available. The widespread popularity and use of this drug among our nation’s youth, as well as its role as a “pipeline” drug (potentially leading to the use of heroin and other lethal drugs) distinguishes it from other controlled substances, and we must be particularly careful before creating the potential for expanded access and use.” 10/8/2010 (Link)
“Sen. Sherrod Brown said Thursday he has serious concerns about the push to legalize marijuana in Ohio. “There are far too many” unanswered questions about the impact of legalizing marijuana, Brown, D-Ohio, told reporters in a conference call.H e said he was particularly concerned about children consuming pot baked into food products. “I want to make sure children don’t get access to marijuana in that way or other ways,” Brown said. “I have significant concerns about it,” Brown said. “It’s a step that we should take with great caution.” Brown said he does support legalizing marijuana for medical purposes. “The evidence is in that it works for a number of patients” to help manage their illnesses, the Ohio Democrat said. 7/9/2015

 

Rob Portman (R)

OHIO

 

Grade: F

Votes

 

Comments

Republican Senator Rob Portman admits to smoking marijuana when he was younger. 5/6/2013 (Link)
“We should not throw in the towel,” Portman said. “Instead, we should be saying to young people, ‘There is a better way for you to have a healthy and productive life, and that’s not to get into drug use and drug abuse.'” “Portman, who like many of his generation has admitted to smoking marijuana in his youth, said he does not support legalization. Instead, he said, efforts should focus on drug prevention and rehabilitation. He mentioned his ongoing efforts to support drug prevention and recovery through the Drug-Free Communities Act.”What I support is a whole different approach with regard to drug use, and that is spending less money on the prosecution and incarceration side and more money on prevention and education, which I know works.” He said a community-wide coalition he started about 20 years ago, focusing on drug abuse in his hometown of Cincinnati (which he represented in the House of Representatives), “has had great success, and relative to other areas that don’t have coalitions, these coalitions are doing a great job.” The Drug-Free Communities Act, for which which Portman is trying to get congressional reauthorization, has helped establish about 2,000 such coalitions, Portman said.”So that’s the approach that I think we ought to be taking,” he said. Legalizing marijuana “is the wrong message to send,” he said, “and instead I think we should be focused more on prevention and education. I know it works.” As for his own pot smoking, Portman told The Plain Dealer in 2005 that it occurred when he was in school. “This was an era when almost everybody did it,” the senator, now 59, said. “It’s something I regret.” 5/15/2015 “I’m very concerned about this,” Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, said of Issue 3. With the heroin epidemic ravaging Ohio, Portman said, “we should not be sending the message to our young people that this is somehow socially acceptable” to use drugs.Portman said the 10-farm limit on commercial cultivation makes Issue 3 even more objectionable. “I don’t understand why the voters of Ohio should be giving certain private entities the ability to corner the market on anything,” Portman said. “That’s just wrong.” 9/13/2015 (Link)

 
 

House of Representatives

Joyce Beatty (D)

OHIO

 

Grade: B

Votes

 

No sponsorships or comments

 

Marcia Fudge (D)

OHIO

 

Grade: B

Votes

 

No sponsorships or comments

 

David Joyce (R)

OHIO

 

Grade: B

Votes

 

No sponsorships or comments

 

Marcy Kaptur (D)

OHIO

 

Grade: B

Votes

 

No sponsorships or comments

 

Tim Ryan (D)

OHIO

 

Grade: B

Votes

 

Cosponsor

*H.R. 525 Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015

 

Steve Stivers (R)

OHIO

 

Grade: B-

Votes

 

Cosponsor

*H.R. 525 Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015

 

Bill Johnson (R)

OHIO

 

Grade: D

Votes

 

No sponsorships or comments

 

Jim Jordan (R)

OHIO

 

Grade: D

Votes

 

No sponsorships or comments

 

Bob Latta (R)

OHIO

 

Grade: D

Votes

 

No sponsorships or comments

 

Jim Renacci (R)

OHIO

 

Grade: D

Votes

 

No sponsorships or comments

 

Pat Tiberi (R)

OHIO

 

Grade: D

Votes

 

No sponsorships or comments

 

Mike Turner (R)

OHIO

 

Grade: D

Votes

 

No sponsorships or comments

 

Brad Wenstrup (R)

OHIO

 

Grade: D

Votes

 

No sponsorships or comments

 

Steve Chabot (R)

OHIO

 

Grade: F

Votes

 

Comments

“He’s against legalizing pot for both recreational and medical use. He feels where it is legal medicinally, it broadens access for other users.” 6/18/2015 (Link)

 

Bob Gibbs (R)

OHIO

 

Grade: F

Votes

 

Comments

“Legalizing marijuana will have a detrimental effect to public safety and society,” 3/9/2016 (Link)

 

Warren Davidson (R)

OHIO

 

Grade:

Votes

No sponsorships or comments