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North Carolina Marijuana Law, Regulation, Penalties, Attornies & Congressman

 

North Carolina Marijuana Law, Regulation, Penalties, Attornies & Congressman

Offense Penalty Incarceration   Max. Fine  

Possession

Personal Use

0.5 oz or less Misdemeanor N/A $ 200
0.5 – 1.5 oz Misdemeanor 1 – 45 days $ 1,000
More than 1.5 oz – 10 lbs Felony 3 – 8 months $ 1,000

With intent to distribute

More than 10 – less than 50 lbs Felony 25* – 39 months $ 5,000
50 – less than 2000 lbs Felony 35* – 51 months $ 25,000
2000 – less than 10,000 lbs Felony 70* – 93 months $ 50,000
10,000 lbs or more Felony 175* – 222 months $ 200,000
* Mandatory minimum sentence

Sale or Delivery

10 lbs or less Felony 4 – 8 months $ 1,000
More than 10 – less than 50 lbs Felony 25* – 39 months $ 5,000
50 – less than 2000 lbs Felony 35* – 51 months $ 25,000
2000 – less than 10,000 lbs Felony 70* – 93 months $ 50,000
10,000 lbs or more Felony 175* – 222 months $ 200,000
To a minor or pregnant women Felony 3 – 8 years N/A
Within 1000 feet of school, child care center, or park grounds Felony 1 – 3 years N/A
* Mandatory minimum sentence

Cultivation

Less than 10 lbs Felony 3 – 8 months $ 1,000
10 – 50 lbs Felony 2* – 2.5 years $ 5,000
50 – 2000 lbs Felony 3* – 3.5 years $ 25,000
2000 – 10,000 lbs Felony 6* – 7 years $ 50,000
10,000 lbs or more Felony 14.5* – 18 years $ 200,000
* Mandatory minimum sentence

Hash & Concentrates

Possession of less than .05 oz Misdemeanor 1 – 10 days $ 200
Possession of .05 – .15 oz Misdemeanor 1 – 45 days $ 200
Possession of more than .15 oz Felony 4 – 6 months $ 200

Paraphernalia

Use, possession, sale, delivery, or manufacture of paraphernalia Misdemeanor 1 – 45 days $ 1,000
To a minor who is at least 3 years younger Felony 3 – 8 months N/A

Civil Asset Forfeiture

Vehicles and other property may be seized.

Miscellaneous

Involving a minor Felony 8 months – 7 years N/A
Possession in a penal institution Felony 4 – 8 months N/A
A fine of $0 is discretionary and is decided on a case-by-case basis by the sitting judge. See below for more details.
If convicted of a felony offense and given probation results in driver’s license forfeiture.

Penalty Details

Marijuana is a Schedule VI substance under the North Carolina Controlled Substances Act.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 90-94

Possession for Personal Use

Possession of 0.5 ounces or less of marijuana is a Class 3 misdemeanor and a maximum fine of $200. Any sentence of imprisonment imposed for this offense must be suspended. Possession of more than 0.5 to 1.5 ounces is a Class 1 misdemeanor punishable by 1 to 45 days imprisonment and a discretionary fine for a first offense, and maximum fine of $1000. Possession of over 1 and a half ounces but less than or equal to 10 pounds is a Class I felony punishable by 3 to 8 months imprisonment and a discretionary fine for a first offense.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 15A-1340.17
  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 15A-1340.23
  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 90-95(d)(4) 

Possession with Intent to Distribute

Possession with intent to distribute less than 10 pounds of marijuana is a class I felony punishable by 3 to 8 months imprisonment and a discretionary fine for a first offense.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 15A-1340.17
  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 90-95(b)(2) 

Possession of more than 10 pounds but less than 50 pounds is a Class H felony punishable by a minimum of 25 months and maximum of 39 months imprisonment and a fine of at least $5,000. Possession of 50 pounds or more but less than 2,000 pounds is a Class G felony punishable by a minimum of 35 months and maximum of 51 months imprisonment and a fine of at least $25,000. Possession of 2,000 pounds or more but less than 10,000 pounds is a Class F felony punishable by a minimum of 70 months and maximum of 93 months imprisonment and a fine of at least $50,000. Possession of 10,000 pounds or more of marijuana is a Class D felony punishable by a minimum of 175 months and maximum of 222 months imprisonment and a fine of at least $200,000.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 90-95(h) 

Sale/Delivery

Delivery of less than 5 grams of marijuana for no compensation is not considered sale or delivery, but may still be prosecuted as possession. Sale of less than 10 pounds of marijuana is a Class H felony punishable by 4 to 8 months imprisonment and a discretionary fine for the first offense. Delivery without compensation of less than 10 pounds is a Class I felony punishable by 3 to 8 months imprisonment and a discretionary fine for a first offense.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 15A-1340.17 
  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 90-95(a)(2) 

Sale or delivery of 10 pounds or more but less than 50 pounds is a Class H felony punishable by a minimum of 25 months and maximum of 30 months imprisonment and a fine of at least $5,000. Sale or delivery of 50 pounds or more but less than 2,000 pounds is a Class G felony punishable by a minimum of 35 months and maximum of 42 months imprisonment and a fine of at least $25,000. Sale or delivery of 2,000 pounds or more but less than 10,000 pounds is a Class F felony punishable by a minimum of 70 months and maximum of 80 months imprisonment and a fine of at least $50,000. Sale or delivery of 10,000 pounds or more of marijuana is a Class D felony punishable by a minimum of 175 months and maximum of 219 months imprisonment and a fine of at least $200,000.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 90-95(h)

Cultivation

Cultivation of less than 10 pounds of marijuana is a class I felony punishable by 3 to 8 months imprisonment and a discretionary fine for a first offense.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 90-95(a)(2) 

Cultivation of 10 pounds or more but less than 50 pounds is a Class H felony punishable by a minimum of 25 months and maximum of 30 months imprisonment and a fine of at least $5,000. Cultivation of 50 pounds or more but less than 2,000 pounds is a Class G felony punishable by a minimum of 35 months and maximum of 42 months imprisonment and a fine of at least $25,000. Cultivation of 2,000 pounds or more but less than 10,000 pounds is a Class F felony punishable by a minimum of 70 months and maximum of 80 months imprisonment and a fine of at least $50,000. Cultivation of 10,000 pounds or more of marijuana is a Class D felony punishable by a minimum of 175 months and maximum of 219 months imprisonment and a fine of at least $200,000.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 90-95(h) 

Hash & Concentrates

Possession of an extract of marijuana resin, commonly referred to as hashish, is a crime in North Carolina. Possession of .05 ounces or less (~1.4 grams) is a Class 3 misdemeanor, which is punishable by a $200 fine and a 1-10 day sentence that must be suspended. Possession of more than .05 ounces (~1.4 grams) but less than .15 ounces (~4.25 grams) is a Class 1 misdemeanor, which is punishable by a fine determined at the discretion of the court and a 1-45 day sentence. Possession of an amount greater than .15 ounce (~4.25 grams) is a Class I felony which has a presumptive sentence of 4-6 months and a discretionary fine may also be assessed by the court.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. §90-95(d)(4) 
  • North Carolina Gen Stat. §15A-1340.17(b)

Paraphernalia

Use, possession, sale, delivery, or manufacture of paraphernalia is a Class 1 misdemeanor punishable by 1 to 45 days imprisonment and a discretionary fine for a first offense. Delivery of paraphernalia by a person aged 18 years or older to a person under the age of 18 who is at least 3 years younger is a Class I felony punishable by 3 to 8 months imprisonment and a discretionary fine for a first offense.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 15A-1340.17 
  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 15A-1340.23 
  • North Carolina Gen Stat. §§ 90-113.22 to 113.23

Sentencing

If a person has a previous controlled substance violation and commits a Class 1 misdemeanor, he will be punished as a Class I felon. If a person has a previous controlled substance violation and commits a Class 2 misdemeanor, he will be guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. If a person has a previous controlled substance violation and commits an offense that requires any sentence of imprisonment be suspended, he is guilty of Class 2 misdemeanor.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. §§ 90-95(e)(3)-(4), (7) 

First time misdemeanor marijuana proceedings may be suspended and the offender placed on probation. The probation must include drug education, unless certain circumstances apply. Upon successful completion of the terms of probation, the charges will be dismissed and the individual discharged.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 90-96 

A person convicted of a marijuana possession, cultivation, or sale/delivery offense may be eligible for probation if they are not sentenced to the maximum term of imprisonment allowed for that offense. This may include a requirement to attend treatment. This probation cannot last longer than 5 years.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 90-95(f)

Forfeiture

Vehicles and other property may be seized for controlled substance violations. Seized property is not subject to be returned to the owner unless he can prove in a forfeiture proceeding that he is the owner and was unaware that it was being used in the violation.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. §§ 90-122 to 112.1 

Miscellaneous

Sale or delivery to a minor or pregnant women

Sale or delivery by a person aged 18 years or older to a person between 14-15 years of age or to a pregnant woman of any age is a Class D felony punishable by 38 to 80 months imprisonment and a fine to be set by the discretion of the court for the first offense. Sale or delivery by a person aged 18 years or older to a person 13 years of age or younger is a Class C felony punishable by 44 to 92 months imprisonment and a fine to be set by the discretion of the court for the first offense.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 15A-1340.17 
  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 90-95(e)(5)
Employing a minor in a drug offense

A person aged 18-20 years who uses a minor in the sale, delivery, or cultivation of marijuana is guilty of a Class G felony if the minor is 14-17 years old, punishable by 8 to 16 months imprisonment and a discretionary fine for the first offense, and a Class F felony if the minor is 13 years of age or younger, punishable by 10 to 20 months imprisonment and a discretionary fine for the first offense. A person aged 21 years or older who uses a minor in the sale, delivery, or cultivation of marijuana is guilty of a Class E felony if the minor is 14-17 years old, punishable by 15 to 31 months imprisonment and a fine to be set by the discretion of the court for the first offense, and a Class D felony if the minor is 13 years of age or younger, punishable by 38 to 80 months imprisonment and a fine to be set by the discretion of the court for the first offense. A person aged 21 years or older who uses a minor in a drug offense may be liable for civil damages for drug addiction.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 15A-1340.17
  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 90-95.4
  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 90-95.5 
Promoting drug sales by a minor

Any person aged 21 years or older who entices, encourages, forces, or supports a minor in selling, delivering, or cultivating marijuana is guilty of a Class D felony punishable by 38 to 80 months imprisonment and a fine to be set by the discretion of the court for the first offense.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 15A-1340.17
  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 90-95.6
Participating in a drug violation by a minor

Any person aged 21 years or older who purchases marijuana from a minor 13 years or younger is guilty of a Class G felony punishable by 8 to 16 months imprisonment and a discretionary fine for the first offense.

See

  • N.C. Gen Stat. § 15A-1340.17 
  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 90-95.7
Sale or delivery on school grounds

Sale or delivery in or within 1,000 feet of school, child care center, or park grounds is class E felony punishable by 15 to 31 months imprisonment and a fine to be set by the discretion of the court for the first offense. Delivery of less than 5 grams of marijuana for no compensation is not considered delivery, but still may be prosecuted for possession.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 15A-1340.17 
  • North Carolina Gen Stat. §§ 90-95(e)(8), (10)
Possession in a penal institution

Possession of any amount of marijuana in a penal institution or local confinement facility is a Class H felony punishable by 4 to 8 months imprisonment and a discretionary fine for the first offense.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 15A-1340.17
  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 90-95(e)(9) 
Reimbursement for undercover marijuana purchases

When a person is convicted of a marijuana offense, the court may order him to reimburse the law enforcement agency for money spent in purchasing marijuana as part of an undercover operation.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 90-95.3
Driver’s license forfeiture

Any time an individual is convicted of a felony offense and is given probation, they are to have their license forfeited.

See

  • North Carolina Gen Stat. § 15A-1331A
CONDITIONAL RELEASE

The state allows conditional release or alternative or diversion sentencing for people facing their first prosecutions. Usually, conditional release lets a person opt for probation rather than trial. After successfully completing probation, the individual’s criminal record does not reflect the charge.

DECRIMINALIZATION

The state has decriminalized marijuana to some degree. Typically, decriminalization means no prison time or criminal record for first-time possession of a small amount for personal consumption. The conduct is treated like a minor traffic violation.

DRUGGED DRIVING

This state has a per se drugged driving law enacted. In their strictest form, these laws forbid drivers from operating a motor vehicle if they have a detectable level of an illicit drug or drug metabolite (i.e., compounds produced from chemical changes of a drug in the body, but not necessarily psychoactive themselves) present in their bodily fluids above a specific, state-imposed threshold. 

HEMP

This state has an active hemp industry or has authorized research. Hemp is a distinct variety of the plant species cannabis sativa L. that contains minimal (less than 1%) amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. Various parts of the plant can be utilized in the making of textiles, paper, paints, clothing, plastics, cosmetics, foodstuffs, insulation, animal feed, and other products. For more information see NORML’s Industrial Use section.

MANDATORY MINIMUM SENTENCE

When someone is convicted of an offense punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence, the judge must sentence the defendant to the mandatory minimum sentence or to a higher sentence. The judge has no power to sentence the defendant to less time than the mandatory minimum. A prisoner serving an MMS for a federal offense and for most state offenses will not be eligible for parole. Even peaceful marijuana smokers sentenced to “life MMS” must serve a life sentence with no chance of parole.

MEDICAL CBD

This state has passed a medical CBD law allowing for the use of cannabis extracts that are high in CBD and low in THC in instances where a physician has recommended such treatment to a patient with a state-qualifying condition.

TAX STAMPS

This state has a marijuana tax stamp law enacted. This law mandates that those who possess marijuana are legally required to purchase and affix state-issued stamps onto his or her contraband. Failure to do so may result in a fine and/or criminal sanction. For more information, see NORML’s report Marijuana Tax Stamp Laws And Penalties.

North Carolina Drugged Driving

In North Carolina, a person commits the offense of impaired driving if he drives while under the influence of an impairing substance; or with any amount of a Schedule I controlled substance, as listed in, or its metabolites in his blood or urine.* N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 20-138.1(a) (West 2010).

*NOTE: Actual impairment is not an element of this offense.

Implied Consent

  • Any person who drives a vehicle on a highway or public vehicular area thereby gives consent to a chemical analysis if charged with an implied-consent offense. Any law enforcement officer who has reasonable grounds to believe that the person charged has committed the implied-consent offense may obtain a chemical analysis of the person. Id. § 20-16.2(a).
  • Under the implied-consent law, an operator can refuse any test, but his or her license will be revoked for one year and could be revoked for a longer period of time under certain circumstances, and an officer can compel an operator to be tested under other laws. Id. § 20-16.2.

Penalties

When deciding the penalties in North Carolina, the judge, or the jury in superior court, shall determine whether aggravating or mitigating factors apply. After which, the level of penalty will be determined. Factors include especially reckless or dangerous driving, two or more prior convictions of a motor vehicle offense not involving impaired driving, speeding by the defendant while fleeing or attempting to elude apprehension, driving at the time of the offense that was safe and lawful except for the impairment of the defendant’s faculties, defendant’s driving record, the defendant’s voluntary submission to a mental health facility for assessment, completion of a substance abuse assessment, or any other aggravating or mitigating factors. Id. §§ 20-179(d)-(f).

  • Level One Punishment -fine of up to four thousand dollars ($ 4,000); a term of imprisonment that includes a minimum term of not less than 30 days and a maximum term of not more than 24 months (the term of imprisonment may be suspended only if a condition of special probation is imposed to require the defendant to serve a term of imprisonment of at least 30 days); defendant may be required to complete a substance abuse assessment. Id. § 20-179(g).
  • Level Two Punishment –fine of up to two thousand dollars ($ 2,000); a term of imprisonment that includes a minimum term of not less than seven days and a maximum term of not more than 12 months (the term of imprisonment may be suspended only if a condition of special probation is imposed to require the defendant to serve a term of imprisonment of at least seven days); possible required substance abuse assessment and the education. Id. § 20-179(h)
    • *The judge may impose, as a condition of probation for defendants subject to Level One or Level Two punishments, that the defendant abstain from alcohol consumption for a minimum of 30 days, to a maximum of 60 days, as verified by a continuous alcohol monitoring system. The total cost to the defendant for the continuous alcohol monitoring system may not exceed one thousand dollars ($ 1,000). The defendant’s abstinence from alcohol shall be verified by a continuous alcohol monitoring system of a type approved by the Department of Correction. Id. § 20-179(h1).
  • Level Three Punishment –fine of up to one thousand dollars ($ 1,000); a term of imprisonment that includes a minimum term of not less than 72 hours and a maximum term of not more than six months (the term of imprisonment may be reduced to 72 hour incarceration and 72 hours of community service); defendant required to obtain a substance abuse assessment. Id. § 20-179(i).
  • Level Four Punishment -fine of up to five hundred dollars ($ 500.00); a term of imprisonment that includes a minimum term of not less than 48 hours and a maximum term of not more than 120 days (48 hours of community service can be served in lieu of the term of imprisonment); required substance abuse assessment and treatment required. Id. § 20-179(j).
  • Level Five Punishment –fine of up to two hundred dollars ($ 200.00); a term of imprisonment that includes a minimum term of not less than 24 hours and a maximum term of not more than 60 days (the term of imprisonment may be reduced to 24 hours or imprisonment and 24 hours of community service). Id. § 20-179(k).

Sobriety Checkpoints

In North Carolina, sobriety checkpoints are authorized by statute.

Checkpoints must operate under a written policy that provides guidelines for the pattern, advise the public that an authorized checking station is being operated by having at least one law enforcement vehicle with its blue light in operation during the conducting of the checking station, and the placement of checkpoints should be random or statistically indicated, and agencies shall avoid placing checkpoints repeatedly in the same location or proximity. Id. § 20-16.3A.

  • A North Carolina court held that entering a parking lot to avoid a checkpoint is probable cause for a stop. State v. Johnson, 446 S.E.2d 135 (N.C. App. 1994).
  • A North Carolina court held that is it reasonable for an officer to watch for vehicles that may be attempting to avoid a checkpoint. An officer may reasonably pursue and stop a vehicle which has turned away from a checkpoint in order to determine why the vehicle turned away. State v. Foremen, 527 S.E.2d 921 (N.C. 2000).

Per Se Drugged Driving Laws

North Carolina has a zero tolerance per se drugged driving law enacted For schedule I controlled substances and their metabolites, not including cannabis (which is categorized as schedule VI under state law) or its metabolites. (North Carolina General Statues 20-138.1)

Violating the law is punishable by up to two years in jail upon conviction.

North Carolina’s law took effect December 1, 2006.

North Carolina Hemp Law

Year Passed: 2015

Summary: Senate Bill 313 encourages state-sponsored research pertaining to the cultivation of industrial hemp. The bill also establishes the North Carolina Industrial Hemp Commission to coordinate research efforts with the appropriate departments or programs of North Carolina State University and North Carolina A&T State University.

Statute: § 106-568.50.- .54 (2016)

North Carolina Tax Stamps

Stamp
State Code §105-113.107
Tax Rate $3.50/gram if owner possesses 42.5 grams or more
$.40/gram stems
Penalty for Nonpayment (Civil and Criminal ) 140% of tax and interest
Additional Information
Found unconstitutional as double jeopardy in Lynn v. West, 134 F.3d 582; later amended.
For more information, visit: http://www.dor.state.nc.us/taxes/usub/substance.html

North Carolina Verified Marijuana / Cannabis Attorney / Lawyers

Tony Rollman

828-450-1231

Tony Rollman

Tony Rollman, Attorney at Law
One Oak Plaza Suite 301

AshevilleNC 28801

tonyrollmanlaw.com

Phone: 828-450-1231

Rodney Kight Jr.

828-255-9881

Don Rodney Kight

Kight Law Office, PC
56 College Street Suite 302

AshevilleNC28801

www.kightoncannabis.com

Phone: 828-255-9881

Wiley Nickel

919-585-1486

Wiley Nickel

The Law Offices of Wiley Nickel, PLLC
2401 Weston Parkway Suite 101

CaryNC 27513

wileynickel.com

Phone: 919-585-1486

Robert J. Reeves

704-351-7979

Robert J Reeves

Robert J. Reeves P.C.
301 S. McDowell Street Suite 814

CharlotteNC 28204

scmarijuanadefense.com

Phone: 704-351-7979

Aaron Lee

704-222-7525

Aaron Lee

Robert J. Reeves P.C.
301 South McDowell Street Suite 814

CharlotteNC28204

www.CharlotteMarijuanaLawyer.com

Phone: 704-222-7525

Jonathan Breeden

919-661-4970

Jonathan Breeden

Breeden Law Office
100 Professional Court Ste 102

GarnerNC27529

www.breedenfirm.com

Phone: 919-661-4970

Clinton L Rudisill

828-380-0990

Clinton L Rudisill

Rudisill and Assoicates, PA
P.O. Box 661

Mars HillNC28754

Phone: 828-380-0990

Sean P Cecil

919-828-1456

Sean P Cecil

Edelstein & Payne
315 E. Jones Street PO Box 28186

RaleighNC27601

www.edelsteinpayne.com

Phone: 919-828-1456

Nick Clifford

919-256-3709

Andrew Nicholas Clifford

Clifford Law Group, PLLC
410 N Boylan Ave Suite 133

RaleighNC27603

www.thecliffordlawgroup.com

Phone: 919-256-3709

Meredith Pierce Ezzell

910-799-6888

Meredith Pierce Ezzell

The Bankruptcy Center
4427 Junction Park Drive

WilmingtonNC28412

www.ncbankruptcycenter.com

Phone: 910-799-6888

North Carolina Congressman

Senators

Thom Tillis (R)

NORTH CAROLINA

Grade: C

Votes

Cosponsor

S. 1333: Therapeutic Hemp Medical Access Act of 2015
*S. 3077: Marijuana Effective Drug Studies (MEDS) Act of 2016
*S. 3269: Cannabidiol Research Expansion Act

Comments

Marijuana: Do you support efforts to decriminalize and/or legalize marijuana? Tillis: Supports low-THC extract for childhood epilepsy, opposes other medical marijuana 10/19/2014 (Link)

Richard Burr (R)

NORTH CAROLINA

Grade: D

Votes

Comments

(Link)
8/10/2010 “For example, Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.), who holds the dubious distinction of the being the member of Congress who has accepted the largest amount from pharmaceutical firms, has taken a stance against state legalization of marijuana.” 5/28/2011 (Link)

House of Representatives

Walter Jones Jr. (R)

NORTH CAROLINA

Grade: B+

Votes

Cosponsor

HR 1538 CARERS
*H.R. 525 Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015
*H.R. 667 Veterans Equal Access Act
*H.R. 1635 Charlotte’s Web Medical Access Act of 2015

G.K. Butterfield (D)

NORTH CAROLINA

Grade: B

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Renee Ellmers (R)

NORTH CAROLINA

Grade: B

Votes

Cosponsor

H.R. 525 Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015

David Price (D)

NORTH CAROLINA

Grade: B

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Alma Adams (D)

NORTH CAROLINA

Grade: C

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Virginia Foxx (R)

NORTH CAROLINA

Grade: D

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

George Holding (R)

NORTH CAROLINA

Grade: D

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Richard Hudson (R)

NORTH CAROLINA

Grade: D

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Patrick McHenry (R)

NORTH CAROLINA

Grade: D

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Mark Meadows (R)

NORTH CAROLINA

Grade: D

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Robert Pittenger (R)

NORTH CAROLINA

Grade: D

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

David Rouzer (R)

NORTH CAROLINA

Grade: D

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Mark Walker (R)

NORTH CAROLINA

Grade: D

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Equal Medicine Organization Medical Marijuana Cannabis Cultivation